THE TRANSATLANTIC LINK DURING THE DECADE PRIOR TO ROMANIA’S ACCESSION IN NATO (1994 – 2004): TEMPORARY DISSENTIONS AND PERMANENT COMMON VALUES & INTERESTS

  • Valerică CRUCERU The" Carol I" National Defense University

Abstract

Abstract: During the decade that preceded Romania’s accession in NATO (1994 – 2004), the
transatlantic link was challenged by a series of divergences, with the United States’ unilateralism
being considered the most important element of dissention, over many political and military issues.
The temporary dissentions did not conduct to separation, both the United States and the
European officials expressing their commitment to the strengthening of the transatlantic link, within
a strong NATO. The USA Security Strategy, the EU Security Strategy, the final statements of NATO
summits, stress the importance of preserving the transatlantic link. All NATO members share the
same values and have common economic and security interests.

Author Biography

Valerică CRUCERU, The" Carol I" National Defense University
Născut la 19 decembrie 1967 în Dumbrăveni, Vrancea, a urmat cursurile scolii generale din localitatea natala, apoi Liceul Militar “Dimitrie Cantemir” Breaza, absolvit in 1986. Au urmat Şcoala Militară de Ofiţeri Activi “Nicolae Bălcescu” (Sibiu,1989, şef promoţie arma infanterie) si cursuri de specializare la Universitatea Infanteriei Marine, Quantico–SUA ( 1996 si 1998); in 2002 a absolvit Facultatea de Comandă şi Stat Major / A.Î.S.M. Bucureşti (şef promoţie forţe terestre). Studiile universitare avansate (2002 – 2006) au fost: Master în domeniul “Relaţii Internaţionale”, Şcoala Naţională de Studii Politice şi Administrative, Bucureşti; Doctorat în domeniul “Ştiinţe Militare”, U.N.Ap.“Carol I”, Bucureşti;

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Published
2014-03-18
Section
Articole